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November 18, 2010

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David

Is this achievement something Kellas was striving for? Nearly 100 years ago, would he have known he set an altitude record? Or were those things not really measured/kept?

Jake Norton

Hi David,

Kellas definitely wasn't going for a record, as, according to Mitchell, the altitude of Pauhunri at the time was thought to be only 7065m, which gave Longstaff the record on Trisul in 1907. It was resurveyed years later, and given its new altitude of 7128m.

So, he knew he was climbing high, but just didn't know quite how high!

Thanks,

Jake

Philip Summers

I wonder how Mt Kellas compares in difficulty to the North East ridge route on Everest proper?.
With an altitude comparable to the North Col, it's quite high, but in terms of technical difficulty, one wonders if Mallory and co, could summit Mt Kellas, then what, if anything does it say about Mallory's ability on his final climb on Everest?
Moreso, if they took a route that was different to the obvious route approaching the summit from right to left, up the ridge.
It may be worthwhile looking at this climb in more detail and especially if the route they took in 1921 was quite hard.
There may be lessons for 1924 here perhaps?.
Something that readily leaps to my mind at least.
Hmmmmmm.

Descargar

Overcome this challenge that some day before too long, because the records are to overcome, no? Let's see if we manteneis the day of this sort of thing.

Ralph Wondraschek

Hi Jake,

it is now generally accepted that as early as 1883, William Woodman Graham, Emil Boss and Ulrich Kaufmann reached the summit of Kabru (7338 m) in Western Sikkim.

See http://www.himalaya-info.org/Kabru%20Alpine%20Journal%202010.pdf

It was to be 47 years later (!!!) before a higher peak was successfully scaled (Jongsang Peak 1930, 7470 m, Western Sikkim).

Regards,

Ralph

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